Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/70130/4279
Title: The frequency and magnitude of large-scale disasters in recent years has prompted increased interest in better understanding how major disruptive events alter key demographic processes. Natural, as well as man-made disasters that have occurred in Sri Lanka so far have proved its impact on Sri Lanka's demography. However, the Tsunami disaster which occurred on the 26th of December 2004 had a major impact on the demography of the country, considering its magnitude and large scale influence to the human population. This study aims to examine the fertility implications after the tsunami disaster in Sri Lanka in the worst tsunami hit district in Sri Lanka. The study further attempts to observe and examine changes in relation to fertility among the tsunami affected population in the district by comparing the pre-tsunami situation. Although Sri Lanka has been experiencing gradual changes in mortality and fertility as predicted by demographic transition theory, this natural disaster may have produced some imbalances with regard to both levels and patterns of fertility and mortality in the affected areas.
Authors: Weeratunga, Manori Kaluthantiri
Keywords: : Natural disasters, affected community, fertility desires, demographic process
Issue Date: 10-Dec-2015
Publisher: University of Colombo
Citation: Annual Research Symposium, University of Colombo, December 2015
Abstract: The frequency and magnitude of large-scale disasters in recent years has prompted increased interest in better understanding how major disruptive events alter key demographic processes. Natural, as well as man-made disasters that have occurred in Sri Lanka so far have proved its impact on Sri Lanka's demography. However, the Tsunami disaster which occurred on the 26th of December 2004 had a major impact on the demography of the country, considering its magnitude and large scale influence to the human population. This study aims to examine the fertility implications after the tsunami disaster in Sri Lanka in the worst tsunami hit district in Sri Lanka. The study further attempts to observe and examine changes in relation to fertility among the tsunami affected population in the district by comparing the pre-tsunami situation. Although Sri Lanka has been experiencing gradual changes in mortality and fertility as predicted by demographic transition theory, this natural disaster may have produced some imbalances with regard to both levels and patterns of fertility and mortality in the affected areas.
URI: http://archive.cmb.ac.lk:8080/research/handle/70130/4279
Appears in Collections:Department of Demography

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